Loader

Speakers - Antonio Euzébio G. Santana

Type of the Presentation: (Plenary Lecture)

 

THE PEST CONTROL RESEARCH PERFORMED BY THE GROUP OF UFAL AND PHEROMONE TO CONTROL THE MAIN CASHEW PEST AT THE NORTHEAST OF BRAZIL

 

Antonio Euzébio G. Santana 

 

Alagoas Federal University – Brazil

*Correspondence: aegs@qui.ufal.br

 

Many insects have highly developed chemosensory capabilities, which are used for the communication between individual sand for detection of food sources, among other functions. This could be one of the reasons for their survival, since in memorial times. Pheromone traps have been employed as a way for population monitoring for many harm full insect species. We will discuss our trajectory in the Field of Chemicalecology, represented mainly by pheromones’development and actions developed by our group to control pests of both lepidoptera and coleopterans. Some of the studied species are emerging pest insects in Brazil, and they carry the potential for causing major damage to the Brazilian agricultural sector, for example cerambycids. Alternative and sustainable control methods are sought to complement the use of classic insecticides.

Cerambycid beetles are a large insect family with about 35,000 described species.  Many species provide valuable ecosystem services by initiating the breakdown of fallen trees and other woody biomass, but can seriously damage and kill living trees.  There are especially important as invasive species, because they are easily transported by global commerce, and in the new countries, they are freed from their coevolved natural enemies, and so can become major pests.  Prior to 2005, less than 10 attractant pheromones had been identified from cerambycids, and the general consensus was that volatile pheromones did not play a major role in cerambycid reproductive behaviors.  In contrast, since that time, volatile pheromones have been identified from >>100 species, and have been shown to play a major role as mediators of cerambycid behaviors.  The empirical evidence from the identification of these pheromones suggested that pheromone structures were generally highly conserved within related taxonomic groups (genera and tribes), for example, with a single structure serving as a pheromone for numerous species.  However, more recent results suggest that although some structures are highly conserved across a variety of species, other species appear to have diverged from the norm, and have evolved pheromones that are somewhat to entirely different from the more generic pheromone structures.  The identification, synthesis, and field testing of selected examples of the entire spectrum of pheromones, from highly conserved among numerous species, to possibly unique to a single species, will be described.