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Abstracts - Ranna H. S. Bezerra

HERBIVORE-INDUCED VOLATILE IN CASSAVA: A COMPARISON OF EMISSION PROFILE INDUCED BY Erinnyis ello ello AND Mononychellus tanajoa

 Delia M. Pinto-Zevallos1, Silvia R. Souza2, Ranna H. S. Bezerra1 and Bianca G. Ambrogi1

1 Laboratório de Ecologia Química, Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Marechal Rondon, s/n - Jardim Rosa Elze, CEP 49100-000, São Cristóvão-SE, Brazil

2 Instituto de Botânica, Centro de Pesquisa em Ecologia e Fisiologia, Av. Miguel Estefano Agua Funda, CEP 09560-500, São Paulo, SP – Brazi

*Correspondence: bianca.ambrogi@gmail.com

Upon herbivory plants respond to stress with the emission of a novel blend of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that mediate important ecological interactions1. For these interactions to occur, qualitative and/or quantitative variations in VOC profiles are crucial. Herbivore-induced VOCs in cassava are known to attract natural enemies of herbivores, but little is known about the chemical nature of these compounds2. In order to characterize the herbivore-induced VOCs in cassava plants, we collected and analyzed VOCs induced upon herbivory by two specialist species with different feeding habits: the cassava hornworm Erinnys ello ello (Lepidoptera) and the cassava green mite Mononychellus tanajoa (Acari:Tetranychidae). Both are major pests in cassava plantations. The results showed that the cassava hornworm induced larger amounts of green leaf volatiles and terpenoids. Seven compounds namely (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol, (E)-2-hexenal and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, d-limonene, 3-carene, γ-terpinene and (E)-β-ocimene were specifically induced by E. ello, that is they were not detected in the headspace of uninfested (control) and mite-infested plants. In contrast, the cassava green mite induced the emission of methyl salicylate (MeSA), which was not detected in the headspace of caterpillar-induced plants. The results suggest that the hornworms are able to activate JA-dependent responses despite they avoid direct defenses in cassava by displaying leaf-trenching behavior. The results also support previous studies3 showing that MeSA is specifically induced by mites.

Refs.

  1. Dudareva, N. et al., New Phytol. 198,16, 2013.

  2. Pinto-Zevallos, D.M et al., Phytochemistry 130, 10, 2016.

  3. De Boer, J.G. et al., J. Chem Ecol. 30, 2215, 2004.