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Abstracts - Lucas Rocha

Type of the Presentation: Oral presentation

PREFERENCE OF Cotesia flavipes FOR TWO GENOTYPES OF SUGAR CANE (Saccharum sp.) AND DEVELOPMENT OF C. flavipes ON CATERPILLARS OF Diatraea saccharalis WHEN FED WITH THESE TWO GENOTYPES

Amália Victoria Ceballos Gonzalez ¹, Lucas Rocha¹, Gislaine de Souza¹, Mikaelison Silva¹, Laura Marcela Machuca-Mesa¹ and Eraldo Lima¹

1 Department of Entomology, Federal University of Viçosa, Viçosa, MG, Brazil

* Correspondence: eraldo.lima@gmail.com

Plants attacked by herbivores synthesize and emit volatiles that can act on the second or third trophic level. Some volatiles induced by herbivores are used as signals by natural enemies of these herbivores to locate their hosts or prey. Studies done with C. flavipes report the use of volatiles emitted by attacked plants to locate their host, also demonstrating that the success of the parasitoids can change with the quality and characteristics of the plant that served as food for the host. We studied the preference of C. flavipes for two sugarcane genotypes plants, clean and infested with D. saccharalis caterpillars, also evaluating development time, survival of parasitized caterpillars, the number of parasitoids and the proportion of females of C. flavipes emerged. Females of C. flavipes prefer odors emitted by plants infested with D. saccharalis caterpillars on clean plants, both in susceptible and resistant genotypes. When contrasted, the parasitoid showed no preference to the odors emitted by plants of the two genotypes infested or clean. The number of adults of C. flavipes was higher for wasps grown on caterpillars fed with the resistant genotype when compared to the susceptible genotype. However, there were no differences in the development time, survival of parasitized caterpillars and the proportion of C. flavipes females emerged from caterpillars fed on sugarcane plants of the two genotypes. The results show that the genotype considered resistant does not negatively affect the development and fitness of C. flavipes, therefore, it has potential to be used in IPM programs.