Loader

Abstracts - Gabriela B. P. Rabeschini

Oral presentation:

Do flowers pollinated by Xylocopa bees smells differently from flowers pollinated by other genera of bees?

Gabriela B. P. Rabeschini1*, Carlos E. P. Nunes2, (Speaker underline)

1 Biologist, Master’s student in Ecology at Universidade Estadual de Campinas; gabi.rabeschini@gmail.com

2 Biologist, PhD in Plant Biology at Universidade Estadual de Campinas; cepnunes@gmail.com

* Correspondence: gabi.rabeschini@gmail.com

One of the most important means of communication between flowering plants and their pollinators is through olfactory cues. Additionally, some specific components can be associated with specific pollination syndromes. In this work, we tried to establish relationships in the composition of volatiles found in floral fragrances of plant species mainly pollinated by bees from the Xylocopa genus and to find compounds that could serve as indicators for these relationships. Data compilation in the literature resulted in 29 species, nine of them being mainly pollinated by Xylocopa and 20 mainly pollinated by other genera of bees that search for food. There was no significant difference in the floral scent as a whole between the two group of species. However, the irregular terpene β-ionone and the benzenoid methyl (E)-cinnamate were statistically significantly associated with the group of species mainly pollinated by Xylocopa bees, thus allowing them to be considered “indicator” or “predictor” compounds. There was a weak phylogenetic signal for both the floral scent of the 29 species in general and for the β-ionone and methyl (E)-cinnamate specifically, suggesting that their presence could be explained by the action of balancing selective pressures caused by preferential attraction of large-bodied pollinators like Xylocopa bees.